Fetching and Building Mission Control 8+

As described in a previous post, Mission Control is now on GitHub. Since this alters how to fetch and build OpenJDK Mission Control, this is an updated version of my old post on how to fetch and build JMC from version 8 and up.

Getting Git

First step is to get Git, the SCM used for OpenJDK Mission Control. Installing Git is different for different platforms, but here is a link to how to get started:

https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Getting-Started-Installing-Git

Installing the Skara Tooling (Optional)

This is an optional step, making it easier if you want to contribute to Mission Control:

http://hirt.se/blog/?p=1186

Cloning the Source

Once Git is installed properly, getting the source is as easy as cloning the jmc repo. First change into the directory where you want to check out jmc. Then run:

git clone https://github.com/openjdk/jmc.git

Getting Maven

Since you probably have some Java experience, you probably already have Maven installed on your system. If you do not, you now need to install it. Simply follow the instructions here:

https://maven.apache.org/install.html

Building Mission Control

First we need to ensure that Java 8 is on our path. Some of the build components still use JDK 8, so this is important.

java –version

This will show the Java version in use. If this is not a Java 8 JDK, change your path. Once done, we are now ready to build Mission Control. Open up two terminals. Yep, two!

In the first one, go to where your cloned JMC resides and type in and execute the following commands (for Windows, replace the dash (/) with a backslash (\)):

cd releng/third-party
mvn p2:site
mvn jetty:run

Now, leave that terminal open with the jetty running. Do not touch.

In the second terminal, go to your cloned jmc directory. First we will need to build and install the core libraries:

cd core
mvn install

Next run maven in the jmc root:

mvn clean package

JMC should now be building. The first time you build Maven will download all of the third party dependencies. This will take some time. Subsequent builds will be less painful. On my system, the first build took 6:01 min. The subsequent clean package build took 2:38.

Running Mission Control

To start your recently built Mission Control, run:

Windows

target\products\org.openjdk.jmc\win32\win32\x86_64\jmc.exe -vm %JAVA_HOME%\bin

Mac OS X

target/products/org.openjdk.jmc/macosx/cocoa/x86_64/JDK\ Mission\ Control.app/Contents/MacOS/jmc -vm $JAVA_HOME/bin

Contributing to JDK Mission Control

To contribute to JDK Mission Control, you need to have signed an Oracle Contributor Agreement. More information can be found here:

http://openjdk.java.net/contribute/

Don’t forget to join the dev list:

http://mail.openjdk.java.net/mailman/listinfo/jmc-dev

We also have a Slack (for contributors), which you can join here:

https://join.slack.com/t/jdkmissioncontrol/signup

More Info

For more information on how to run tests, use APIs etc, there is a README.md file in the root of the repo. Let me know in the comments section if there is something you think I should add to this blog post and/or the README!

Using the Skara Tooling

I’m writing this for myself as much as I’m writing this to share. After only a day of using JMC with Skara, I’ve fallen in love with it. I spend less time painstakingly putting together review e-mails, copying and pasting code to comment on certain lines of code, cloning separate repos to do parallel work efficiently, setting up new workspaces for the these repos etc. Props to the Skara team for saving me time by cutting out a big chunk of the stuff not related to coding and a whole lot of ceremony.

Note that the Skara tooling can be used outside of the scope of OpenJDK – git sync alone is a good reason for why everyone who wants to reduce ceremony can benefit from the Skara tooling.

So, here are a few tips on how to get started:

  1. Clone Skara:
    git clone https://github.com/openjdk/skara
  2. Build it:
    gradlew (win) or sh gradlew (mac/linux)
  3. Install it:
    git config --global include.path "%CD%/skara.gitconfig" (win) or git config --global include.path "$PWD/skara.gitconfig" (mac/linux)
  4. Set where to sync your forks from:
    git config --global sync.from upstream

For folks on Red Hat distros, 2 and 3 can be replaced by make install. For more information on the installation, see the Skara wiki.

Some examples:

To sync your fork with upstream and pull the changes:

git sync --pull

To list the open PRs:

git pr list

To create a PR:

git pr create

To push your committed changes in your branch to your fork, creating the remote branch:

git publish

JMC Workflow

Below is the typical work-flow for JMC.

First ensure that you have a fork of JMC. Either fork it on github.com, or on the command line:
git fork https://github.com/openjdk/jmc jmc

You typically just create that one fork and stick with it.

  1. (Optional) Sync up your fork with upstream:
    git sync --pull
  2. Create a branch to work on, with a name you pick, typically related to the work you plan on doing:
    git checkout –b <branchname>
  3. Make your changes / fix your bug / add amazing stuff
  4. (Optional) Run jcheck locally:
    git jcheck local
  5. Push your changes to the new branch on your fork:
    git publish (which is pretty much git push --set-upstream origin <branchname>)
  6. Create the PR, either on GitHub, or from the command line:
    git pr create

Summary / TL;DR

  • I ❤️ Skara

Mission Control is Now Officially on GitHub!

Since this morning, the JDK Mission Control (JMC) project has gone full Skara! mc_512x512This means that the next version (JMC 8.0) will be developed over at GitHub.

To contribute to JDK Mission Control, you (or the company you work for) need to have signed an OCA, like for any other OpenJDK-project. If you already have an OpenJDK username, you can associate your GitHub account with it.

Just after we open sourced JMC, I created a temporary mirror on GitHub to experiment with working with JMC at GitHub. That mirror is now closed for business. Please use the official OpenJDK one from now on:

https://github.com/openjdk/jmc

If you forked or stared the old repo, please feel free to fork and/or star the new one!

JFR is Coming to OpenJDK 8!

I recently realized that this isn’t common knowledge, so I thought I’d take the opportunity to talk about the JDK Flight Recorder coming to OpenJDK 8! The backport is a collaboration between Red Hat, Alibaba, Azul and Datadog. These are exciting times for production time profiling nerds like me. Smile

The repository for the backport is available here:

http://hg.openjdk.java.net/jdk8u/jdk8u-jfr-incubator/

The proposed CSR is available here:

https://bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8230764

The backport is keeping the same interfaces and pretty much the same implementation as is available in OpenJDK 11, and is fully compatible. There were a few security fixes, due to there not being any module system to rely upon for isolation of the internals, also, some events will not be available (e.g. the Module related events) but other than that the API and tools work exactly the same.

JDK Mission Control will, of course, be updated to work flawlessly with the OpenJDK 8 version of JFR as well. The changes will be minute and are only necessary since Mission Control has some built-in assumptions that no longer hold true.

You can already build and try out OpenJDK 8 with JFR simply by building the JDK available in the repository mentioned above. Also, Aleksey Shipilev provide binaries – see here for details.

Have fun! Smile

Flight Recorder & Mission Control at Code One 2019

Code One is rapidly approaching (September 16-19). For fans of JDK Flight Recorder and JDK Mission Control, there will be a lot of relevant activities at Code One. This is an attempt to list them. If I missed something, please let me know!

Sessions

Here are the regular sessions:

Session Name

Presenters Day Time

Location

JDK Mission Control: Where We Are, Where We Are Going [DEV4284]

David Buck Monday 9:00 Moscone South
Room 301

Introduction to JDK Mission Control and JDK Flight Recorder [DEV2316]

Marcus Hirt
Klara Ward
Monday 16:00 Moscone South
Room 202
Improving Observability in Your Application with JFR and JMC [DEV3460] Marcus Hirt
Mario Torre
Tuesday 11:30 Moscone South
Room 201
Java Flight Recorder: Black Box of Java Applications[DEV3957] Poonam Parhar Wednesday 12:30

Moscone South
Room 203

Robotics on JDK 11? With Modules? Are You… [DEV2329] Marcus Hirt
Miro Wengner
Robert Savage
Wednesday 16:00

Moscone South
Room 313

Four Productive Ways to Use Open Source JFR and JMC Revisited [DEV3118] Sven Reimers
Martin Klähn
Thursday 11:15 Moscone South
Room 304
Enhanced Java Flight Recorder at Alibaba [DEV3667] Sanhong Li
Fangxi Yin
Guangyu Zhu
Thursday 12:15 Moscone South
Room 203

Performance Monitoring with Java Flight Recorder on OpenJDK [DEV2406]

Hirofumi Iwasaki
Hiroaki Nakada
Thursday 13:15 Moscone South
Room 201

Again, if I’ve missed one, please let me know!

Other Activities

  • There is going to be a hackergarten session around JMC and JFR, Wednesday at 14:30-16:00, inside of the Groundbreakers booth in the Exhibition Area.
  • On Friday a few JMC project members are planning to meet up for some coding between 10:00 and 12:00, and then have lunch together at 12:00. Ping me (Marcus) for an invite.
  • On Wednesday at 18:00 a few JMC project members are planning to go for dinner. Ping me (Marcus) for an invite.

Summary

  • Lots to do at Code One 2019 for fans of JFR and JMC.
  • Helpful links above. Winking smile

Using Dynamic Working Sets in Eclipse

JDK Mission Control is quite modular. To help navigate the source, working sets come in quite handy. And for a more flexible way to define working sets, Oomph provide a very nice plug-in for constructing dynamic working sets, using rules and regular expressions.

To use, first install the Oomph Dynamic Working Sets plug-in into your Eclipse:
https://wiki.eclipse.org/Dynamic_Working_Sets#Download.2FInstallation

Next either start creating your own working sets, or start out with the ones I use:
https://github.com/thegreystone/jmc-dev-helpers

To edit/create the working sets, go to Preferences | Oomph / Dynamic Working Sets, and press Edit…

Once satisfied with the working sets, you can switch the Package Explorer to using the Working Sets as Top Level Elements:

workingset

Good luck!