JMC 7 Early Access Builds Available (and New Packaging)

Early access builds of JDK Mission Control are now available. They can be fetched from here:

http://jdk.java.net/jmc/

With JMC 7, we are switching to a new delivery model, with a separate installer for JMC. There are multiple reasons for this, such as having one deliverable which supports both OpenJDK and the Oracle JDK, and wasting less disk space for those of us having multiple JDKs installed.

I wrote a blog together with Aurelio with more information here:

https://blogs.oracle.com/java-platform-group/java-mission-control-now-serving-openjdk-binaries-too

We’re still working on providing a good way to provide feedback. Within a few weeks, you should be able to provide feedback through webbugs. Until then, the best way is to talk to us at the OFTC #jmc channel.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

4 Responses to "JMC 7 Early Access Builds Available (and New Packaging)"

  1. Bernd says:

    Could you add a link from the project page http://openjdk.java.net/projects/jmc/ to the downloads (and add release announcements there) as well please. It’s still pretty hard to see what’s going on in the project,

  2. Radim says:

    Hello, as a big fan of JMC 5.x, is there any explanation why the UI did change in 6 and 7 so much? Regrettably not for the better from my POV – it seems that the focus is mostly on automatic analysis rather than presenting ‘raw’ data.

    As an example, one of the common tasks I’ve used to do is go to Memory/Allocation in new TLAB/Allocation by class and start examining the allocation hotspots. I can’t find how to execute that workflow in JMC 7.0. Instead, it now shows break-up by allocating threads (with dozens of worker threads it is of little use).

    Thanks

  3. Marcus says:

    It has been updated!

  4. Marcus says:

    Hi Radim,

    In your case, simply go to Memory and sort on Total allocation. It will use a statistical estimate of the total allocation per class (using the Inside of TLAB events together with the Outside of TLAB events), basically doing what you’d normally be doing in your head for you. 🙂

    Yes, things have changed, and you will sometimes have to look in new places, or do things very differently. But they are not necessarily worse. Some time was spent trying to make the UI easier to use for novice users. Sadly that meant, in some instances, to confuse existing users of JMC 5.x. Also, there is a longer story here that deserves to be told too, even though it may not be applicable to this particular case…

    Sadly, the JMC team was pulled away 5.5 months early from the JMC 6 project (to help out with another effort), so there was preciously little time for polishing. After that the open sourcing took all of the team’s time. Open sourcing a closed source project, is, as anyone who have done it will testify, an immense effort. And after that, well, many of you already know what happened to the Swedish part of the JMC team…

    That said, the new core has some important upgrades, not the least being the new core parser APIs, the filtering, the aggregation and the flexible mechanisms for using these mechanisms in various parts of the UIs. And, as you mentioned, the automated analysis. The foundations are there, but the UI didn’t quite have time to catch up with it all.

    To play with some of it, try my jmc-jshell:
    https://github.com/thegreystone/jmc-jshell

    After Code One I will post a full Hands-on-Lab that will hopefully help explain some of these powerful features. I’ll also try to pick up blogging a bit again.

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